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Tubes vs. Tubeless
 cmoore member offline
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posted 8/1/2018
at 6:38:16 AM
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About 18 months ago I purchased a set of Shimano WH-RS81's that have been great. They came with the valve stems to run tubeless tires so I'm considering going in that direction for my next set of tires. I've never done tubeless so I'm wondering if I can get some feedback here? Is it a pain or will it cause me to wonder why I didn't make the jump long ago? Thanks.

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posted 8/1/2018
at 7:24:47 AM
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It is a pain until you get them sealed. Once they seal they are great.I have gone for weeks without any pressure loss. I am running them on my gravel bike.

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posted 8/1/2018
at 9:56:37 AM
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I haven't taken the plunge yet, but more and more of the new rims I buy end up being tubeless-compatible, so it's an option.

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posted 8/1/2018
at 11:52:53 AM
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" Is it a pain or will it cause me to wonder why I didn't make the jump long ago? "
It is a pain until you get them sealed. Once they seal they are great.I have gone for weeks without any pressure loss. I am running them on my gravel bike.
-- posted by ptsbike


So, you are saying, "yes; both," right?

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posted 8/1/2018
at 12:35:12 PM
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" Is it a pain or will it cause me to wonder why I didn't make the jump long ago? "
It is a pain until you get them sealed. Once they seal they are great.I have gone for weeks without any pressure loss. I am running them on my gravel bike.
-- posted by ptsbike


So, you are saying, "yes; both," right?
-- posted by Thorn


Part of my pain was that I didn't get wide enough tape the first go around. They would not seal. I then actually used duct tape on the second try, and cut it wider. It took a while, but eventually sealed. I now have some Stan's 25mm tape on the way. I am in the process of rotating my tires.

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posted 8/1/2018
at 9:38:37 PM
post #5 viewed 449 times
I have tubeless on both my gravel bikes and will never look back. The hardest part for me is learning to ride around with what seems like a 1/2 flat tire. I started out with 40 lbs rear 35 lbs front and then recently tried 45 rear and 40 front which seems to work much better but this all depends on your weight I am around 200 lbs right now.

The major benefit with running tubeless especially if you are doing gravel is that you can run lower psi than tubed and not get beat up so much. I would doubt that I will ever go tubeless on my roadie bike as I don't get many flats there. At my end I love the Orange Sea endurance over Stans or anything else. You are to fill up every 3-6 months or so and they give you a dip stick with your order which I threw away to check your level every 3 months or so. To do that you will need the Stans core remover. You are to rotate the wheel every couple of weeks during the winter also so it doesn't set up in one place.

Good luck
Zman
post edited on 8/1/2018 at 9:40:49 PM

 cmoore member offline
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posted 8/2/2018
at 5:29:07 AM
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Thanks for the replies. I think for now I will leave good enough alone. I'm on a Felt Road Bike. If I ever switch to a gravel or a mountain bike it might be something to consider.

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posted 8/2/2018
at 7:35:46 AM
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Tubeless works best if you use a complete system (rims, tires, rim strips, valves, sealant). That said, I've been tubeless for 4 years, have no flats, corner better, and have a plusher ride. Highly recommend!

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posted 8/2/2018
at 5:54:45 PM
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Tubeless works best if you use a complete system (rims, tires, rim strips, valves, sealant). That said, I've been tubeless for 4 years, have no flats, corner better, and have a plusher ride. Highly recommend!
-- posted by BikeLady


How much is the average tubeless rim set up for a roadie bike? What rims are you running and are they disk or regular brakes?


Zman

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posted 8/2/2018
at 6:44:29 PM
post #9 viewed 414 times
Tubeless works best if you use a complete system (rims, tires, rim strips, valves, sealant). That said, I've been tubeless for 4 years, have no flats, corner better, and have a plusher ride. Highly recommend!
-- posted by BikeLady


How much is the average tubeless rim set up for a roadie bike? What rims are you running and are they disk or regular brakes?


Zman
-- posted by Zurichman


From the shopping I've done, a decent road tubeless rim brake sheelset can be had on the order of US$300, e.g. for the old Shimano Ultegra sheelset or the current RS-500. I was tempted by the former, but never went for it due to the low spoke count.

But for a foolproof "system" that doesn't require special pumps or tank compressors to fit tires to rims properly, supposedly the Mavic Road UST is the thing to get until tolerances get tighter across the industry or you find a combo that happens to match nicely.

cyclingtips.com/2017/06/mavic-road-ust-tubeless-road-details-prices-specs-weights/

road.cc/content/buyers-guide/207176-your-complete-guide-mavics-2018-road-wheel-range-including-all-new-road


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