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Servicing hubs
 67walkon member offline
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Blue Ridge Bicycle Club - NC
posted 8/30/2016
at 7:53:32 PM
viewed 2685 times
Does anyone do this? My 2006 Roubaix got new Mavic wheels in about 2009 with maybe 15,000 miles. My Lynskey has 2010 Velocity rims with more than 20,000 miles.

So should they get some service? The front wheel on the Lynskey makes a little noise when I stand and put a lot of weight on it. Generally, my bikes are well maintained.

 Redsfan member offline
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posted 8/30/2016
at 9:29:47 PM
post #1 viewed 1613 times
I have taken apart several of my hubs to clean out and replace the old grease and replaced the bearings. The most tricky part is adjusting the tightness of the nuts on the raceway when putting it back together so that it is just the right amount of snugness so that there isn't any play but the wheel still turns freely.

However, you will need to check to make sure you don't have sealed bearings in which case I think the only thing you can do is replace the bearing cartridge.

The mechanics at my favorite bike shop seem to be able to tell when this needs to be done just by holding the hub while they spin the wheel and I can feel the roughness myself when they point it out so you might want to take the wheel off do that test. I will say that I seem to need to do this every 10 to 15 thousand miles on the hubs that have serviceable bearings.

I should also point out that since I can do it it can't be that hard since I can't even seem to replace brake pads correctly the first time and have to redo the pad adjustment several times to get it right.

 podkey member offline
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posted 8/31/2016
at 10:59:22 AM
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Hey Redsfan sounds like maybe ya need to use Shimano brake pads and holders that have the little set screw at the back. With those if the brake pads have been correctly adjusted one time you don't need to do more in the future. Just loosen up the barrel adjuster, undo the allen screw, slide out the old pads and slide in the new ones. Done.

This assumes they were done correctly one time and that you have enough barrel adjustment to cover the range from new pad thickness to worn out thickness. Most brakes do work like that.

Yeah with regular bearings I have found it useful to re-grease them every 3000-4000 miles. With sealed bearings I often go many years before dealing with them.

Noise is never good in my book.

 Gnu member offline
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posted 8/31/2016
at 12:06:57 PM
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When servicing standard wheel bearings you should allow a slight margin of play in the wheel so that the bearings contact the cone in the radial axis of the wheel and not in the axial plane. Also keep in mind that the skewer adds tension to the axle, stretches it slightly, and will reduce bearing clearance. It helps make the task easier if you put the wheel in a vice or use a large wrench to hold one side of the axle in place while you adjust the other side.

Carry on.

Das Gnu

 Redsfan member offline
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posted 8/31/2016
at 1:11:47 PM
post #4 viewed 1586 times
Hey Redsfan sounds like maybe ya need to use Shimano brake pads and holders that have the little set screw at the back. With those if the brake pads have been correctly adjusted one time you don't need to do more in the future. Just loosen up the barrel adjuster, undo the allen screw, slide out the old pads and slide in the new ones. Done.

This assumes they were done correctly one time and that you have enough barrel adjustment to cover the range from new pad thickness to worn out thickness. Most brakes do work like that.
-- posted by podkey
I can only do that with my touring bike. The two bikes I use for errands and commuting have V-brakes and I haven't seen any brake pad holders with replaceable pads for that type.

To make it easier when I change the pads on my touring bike I often take the wheel off.

 tojesky member offline
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posted 8/31/2016
at 4:24:33 PM
post #5 viewed 1574 times
One can service sealed bearings by removing the plastic dust shield, cleaning with a solvent, and re-lubing the bearings. Reinstall the dust shield and put it all together. However no adjusting of the bearings is possible as far as I know.

 vkan member not displaying online status
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posted 8/31/2016
at 6:41:34 PM
post #6 viewed 1569 times
... The two bikes I use for errands and commuting have V-brakes and I haven't seen any brake pad holders with replaceable pads for that type.

To make it easier when I change the pads on my touring bike I often take the wheel off.
-- posted by Redsfan


How about these pads:

www.amazon.com/Kool-Stop-Bicycle-V-Type-Compound/dp/B001T35RSC




 podkey member offline
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posted 8/31/2016
at 10:50:19 PM
post #7 viewed 1564 times
NICE!!! I will switch to those on my hybrid when I wear the old v-pads out. I like the idea of a dual compound too. Probably less noisy I think.

 Redsfan member offline
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posted 9/1/2016
at 7:24:26 AM
post #8 viewed 1555 times
I put a set of Kool-Stop pads on one of my bikes but I don't know if they are the type that have replaceable pads. I will have to check.

However, even if the pads are replaceable, that won't necessarily fix the error I made when I initially installed them. I put the right pad on the left side and the left pad on the right side.

 tojesky member offline
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posted 9/1/2016
at 9:06:35 AM
post #9 viewed 1550 times
...

I put the right pad on the left side and the left pad on the right side.
-- posted by Redsfan
Sounds like a Johnny Cash song.

 markiansj member offline
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posted 9/1/2016
at 10:31:10 AM
post #10 viewed 1544 times
More like a wedding song...

"You put the right pad on,
You take the left pad off,
You put the right pad on,
And shake the bearings about..."

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